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Some of the amazing members of the Seattle Globalist community.
Some of the amazing members of the Seattle Globalist community.

The Seattle Globalist is proud to recognize three brilliant Globalist writers that have made outstanding contributions to our publication this year, helping to grow our coverage and make 2015 a phenomenal year for us.

Please join us in recognizing these dynamos at our Third Annual Globie Awards on Saturday, Sept. 26, along with Globalist of the Year Rita Meher:

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July is here, and with it patriotism, fire & thrills — and we aren’t even talking about the fireworks! The Globalist Calendar is just bursting with Bollywood this month. Lava’s shooting out as well, as we see what can be learned from the world’s volcanoes. Don’t forget the excitement of leadership and justice training, along with our usual offerings of music, film and dance as you check out my top picks for fun things to do this month!

Members of the Central Area Senior Center Sliders Dance Group learn some West African moves at the November World Dance Party. (The World Dance Party held at the Filipino Community Center in November. (Photo by Steven Zhang)
Members of the Central Area Senior Center Sliders Dance Group learn some West African moves at the November World Dance Party. The World Dance Party held at the Filipino Community Center in November. (Photo by Steven Zhang)

It’s June, and that means Seattle is bursting with fun international and outdoor events. We’ve scoured the  Globalist Calendar for the month and come up with five events you won’t want to miss!

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Before a water system was built by Seattle Nonprofit Water 1st, Mari walked four hours each day to collect water for her family from this small river. (Photo by Marla Smith-Nilson)
Ethiopia: before a water system was built by Seattle Nonprofit Water 1st, Mari walked four hours each day to collect water for her family from this small river. (Photo by Marla Smith-Nilson)

In our increasingly interconnected world, it is important to be informed of issues and events around the globe in order to better understand and engage with the people around us. If you were a foreign news correspondent, where would you like to be assigned? What story would you cover and why is this an important story to tell?

Imagine a long dirt road with several women and girls trudging along it, carrying heavy buckets on their heads. Their destination is a small, muddy pond, full of dirty, brownish water. They know it is a risk to drink this, but it is all they have to drink, so it’s not an option.

President Obama delivers a speech from the White House announcing an expanded military campaign against ISIS.In our increasingly interconnected world, it is important to be informed of issues and events around the globe in order to better understand and engage with the people around us. If you were a foreign news correspondent, where would you like to be assigned? What story would you cover and why is this an important story to tell?

Recently, tragedy struck in a small school just outside of London at the Bethnal Green Academy (BGA). Shockingly, three hard working students chose to leave their families behind and go join the ISIS terrorist group in Syria, they have not been the first to do so either.

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Cocoa beans in a cocoa pod. These are harvested to eventually make chocolate. (Photo via Agricultural Research Service)In our increasingly interconnected world, it is important to be informed of issues and events around the globe in order to better understand and engage with the people around us. If you were a foreign news correspondent, where would you like to be assigned? What story would you cover and why is this an important story to tell?

I am a serious chocoholic. In fact I’m a bit of a chocolate snob. From an early age I developed a unique taste for chocolate, unlike the ordinary, sugar-crazed child begging their parent for a chocolate bar to satisfy their sweet tooth.

I treated chocolate as one of life’s simple pleasures and grew to educate myself on everything there was to know about chocolate. I became not only a frequent consumer, but a chocolate connoisseur. I have tasted chocolate from all around the world, and found that some of the best (and worst) chocolate is made from cocoa beans grown in the farming sectors of Cote d’Ivoire.

Seattle hip hop artist Draze Maraire performs at 4p.m. on Saturday at the NW Folklife Festival. (Photo by Jama Abdirahman)
Seattle hip hop artist Draze Maraire performs at 4p.m. on Saturday at the NW Folklife Festival. (Photo by Jama Abdirahman)

When you say “Folklife Festival” a few things automatically come to mind: food, hippies, the Space Needle, and a long weekend. While all are still well represented in the annual Memorial Day event, it’s the showcasing of ethnic traditions that really give the festival its character.

Since 1972, the Folklife Festival has hosted performances by and vendors from diverse communities within the Pacific Northwest in an effort to increase mutual understanding of the various cultural heritages that make up the region.

This year, 13 different stages and venues will bring the traditions of dozens of countries around the world to life across four packed days. There are tons activities set to pack each day from 11am until 10pm. Here are some unlikely highlights that are worth a visit, even if you weren’t planning to spend all weekend lying on the Seattle Center lawns eating scones:

Old vikings never die — they just move to Poulsbo. (Photo by Andrew Taylor via Flickr)
Old vikings never die — they just move to Poulsbo. (Photo by Andrew Taylor via Flickr)

With The History’s Channel’s hit show “Vikings” inspiring people everywhere to don horned hats and grow beards, “Little Norway’s” VikingFest 2015 gives you a chance to embrace your inner Nord this weekend. 

The 47th Annual Viking Fest offers 3 days of food, drink, live music, and a carnival. Located in historic Poulsbo, on the Kitsap Peninsula, the event offers events and activities for all ages and ethnicities.

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Simon Javan Okelo, Executive Director of One Vibe Africa, in the center with hands out, with his team members and local musicians who support their efforts and work, in Nairobi Kenya. (Photograph by Simon Dixon)

Simon Okelo grew up in the slums of Manyatta in Kisumu, Kenya, an area known for violence, drugs and diseases. Okelo dreamed of peace for himself, and for all of his Kenyan brothers and sisters. His struggles encouraged him, even at a young age, to build opportunities for others and to create a place where people lived free from the fear of violence.

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Give SMALL to the Seattle Globalist today: http://bit.ly/givesmall2015
Give SMALL to the Seattle Globalist today: http://bit.ly/givesmall2015

If you live in Seattle, or have ever made a donation to a Seattle nonprofit, you’ve probably heard about The Seattle Foundation’s GiveBIG campaign approximately 600,000 times in the past couple of weeks. (Just in case your inbox is not currently bursting with GiveBIG emails: it’s an annual, 24 hour, “day of giving” campaign in which the Seattle Foundation and its sponsors offer “stretch” funds and “golden tickets” to increase donations to close to 2,000 participating nonprofits).

This year, we’re asking you to Give SMALL to the Seattle Globalist – and become part of something big. We know there’s power in numbers, so today we want YOU more than we want your cash.

Moroccan specialties: Couscous and Tagine. (Photo by stijnnieuwendijk via Flickr)
Moroccan specialties: Couscous and Tagine. (Photo by stijnnieuwendijk via Flickr)

The Seattle Globalist is thrilled to announce the kickoff of a new event series: “Globalist Foodie Nights.” You’ll enjoy an evening of delicious food and a chance to spend time with fellow Globalists.

On Thursday April 30th,  our first foodie night will feature traditional Moroccan cuisine and hospitality at the Kasbah Moroccan Restaurant in Ballard.

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Globalist co-founder, creative director and columnist Sarah Stuteville presents digital storytelling strategies to some Globalist youth. (Photo courtesy of Sarah Stuteville)

Update, March 10th: This workshop is SOLD OUT. Please write to Christina Twu, christina[at]seattleglobalist.com, to be notified of future sessions.

At The Seattle Globalist our mission is to elevate diverse voices through media. That means working to invite multiple perspectives and channeling them into insightful, published pieces.

So how do you get your voice in the Globalist? 

Find out on Thursday, March 12 at 6 p.m. with Globalist co-founder, creative director and Seattle Times/Globalist weekly columnist Sarah Stuteville.

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Mr.’s painting “Stationed at the Convenience Store” 2013, Acrylic on canvas, 59 1/16 × 118 1/8in. (Photo courtesy Lehmann Maupin)

The Japanese artist Mr. brings his first solo museum exhibition in the United States , a series titled “Live On,” to the Seattle Asian Art Museum (SAAM) beginning Friday Nov. 22nd.

Mr. is a protegé of the prolific contemporary Japanese artist Takashi Murakami, and derives his name from the Yomiuri Giants professional baseball team’s player Shigeo “Mr. Giants” Nagashima. Mr. has said that the March 2011 tsunami that hit Japan’s Tohoku coast had a profound effect on his work.

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Chinese dumplings. (Photo by Ryan McLaughlin via Flickr)
Chinese dumplings. (Photo by Ryan McLaughlin via Flickr)

Although there are 3,553 Chinese international students enrolled at the University of Washington, it can be easy to get homesick.

That is why the Chinese Student Association (CSA) introduced Dumpling Night a few years ago.

Held every fall quarter, Dumpling Night gives students a chance to learn how to make dumplings said Ray Li, the CSA’s activities coordinator, “It definitely helps with homesickness and gives people a sense of belonging.”

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This 1995 photograph shows scientist with personal protective equipment (PPE) testing samples from animals collected in Zaire for the Ebola virus. (Public domain photo via Wikipedia)
This 1995 photograph shows scientist with personal protective equipment (PPE) testing samples from animals collected in Zaire for the Ebola virus. (Public domain photo via Wikipedia)

Misinformation has come to define the Ebola outbreak, at least in North America, where there have only been 3 confirmed cases, as opposed to West Africa where more than 13,000 are infected.

Tonight, the Washington Global Health Alliance and CodeMed are joining forces to present factual information on the Ebola outbreak to a Seattle audience.

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Join The Seattle Globalist, Crosscut, the World Affairs Council and Impact Hub Seattle for The Scenario Thursday Sept. 18th

The Scenario is a global current events game, co-hosted by Crosscut Public Media, the World Affairs Council, Impact Hub Seattle, and the Seattle Globalist, in which issues and situations from around the world are applied as if they’re occurring right here in the Northwest.

Join us Thursday September 18th, when we’ll tackle the challenge of climate refugees in the Pacific Northwest.

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The UW School of Music's Zimarimba celebration honors the legacy of Zimbabwean marimba (pictured above) music at the UW. (Photo by Serge Saint via Flickr)
The UW School of Music’s Zimarimba celebration honors the legacy of Zimbabwean marimba (pictured above) music at the UW. (Photo by Serge Saint via Flickr)

The sounds of Zimbabwe will fill the Brechmin Auditorium on Friday afternoon, as the building plays host to a celebration of the legacy of Zimbabwean marimba music at the UW.

The marimba is a type of xylophone used widely in Central and West African music. Friday’s celebration will feature a pair of hands-on marimba workshops, a panel discussion, and a free concert.