Aid and Development

A young Maasai woman with her head shaved — part of many rites of passage in Maasai culture. (Photo from Flickr by Javier Carcamo)

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Maasai women in Kenya are finding ways to replace 'the cut' with alternative rites of passage.

Seahawks super bowl xlix shirt

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Thousands of T-shirts that would have adorned happy Seahawks fans if they'd won the Super Bowl will head to developing countries for people in need.

Kennie Amaefule (Photo by Anil Kapahi / Columns Magazine)

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For Seattle aid volunteers headed to West Africa, a fine balance between compassion and fear.

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While I love to travel, I wanted more than just a snapshot of a cultural experience. I was looking for a genuine opportunity to engage in a complex and rich culture.

(Photo by Brett Konen)

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How the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere is recovering from disaster — with a little help from Seattle.

Seattle BAYAN activist Jill Mangaliman rallies with locals just as a human barricade begins to form in front of the Digos City national highway on Dec. 10. (Photo by Katrina Pestano)

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People’s voices carry through the streets in the Soccsksargen region of Southern Mindanao, Philippines during a three-day march Seattle activists joined earlier this month.

Eco Kargha weaver Poonam Devi prepares bobbins of silk thread, January 2013.

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Extreme poverty is an unavoidable reality in India. The first time I traveled in the country — as an inexperienced and idealistic 20-year-old backpacker...

Ziplock bags full of Metformin, a medication used to treat diabetes, donated to Seattle's Salaam Cultural Museum for delivery to Syrian refugees in Jordan. (Photo by Alisa Reznick)

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Collecting unused meds and giving them to needy people overseas isn’t legal. But some Seattleites are doing it anyways.

Carol Glenn, a former Seattle nurse, collected leftover HIV/AIDS drugs to send overseas. It wasn't legal, but Glenn believed it was her duty. (Photo by Isolde Raftery / KUOW)

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At the height of the AIDS crisis, nurse Carol Glenn ran a secret pipeline to get leftover drugs from Seattle to sick people in the developing world.

From left to right, Laune Torres, Rosie Dino, Elaine and Jill Mangiliman read a letter aloud to Jennifer Laude in mourning, authored by Katrina Pestano.

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Activists gathered Sunday in a vigil for a trans woman in the Philippines who was allegedly murdered by a U.S. marine stationed there.

A beachside building in Majuro, capital of the Marshall Islands. (Photo by Mrlins from Flickr)

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Hailing from a tiny island nation ravaged by American nuclear testing, a growing population of Marshall islanders are struggling to make a home here without access to citizenship.

Pastor George Everett speaking to Mercer Island Presbyterian Church about the Ebola outbreak in his home country of Liberia. (Photo by Sarah Stuteville)

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Liberian-Americans say they have the knowledge to help contain the outbreak in their home country, but they don't have the money

A WWII era poster encourages saving food scraps to feed animals. (Photo from National Archives)

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Kirkland resident Gina VanLoon hardly has any food waste in her compost bin. But that isn’t something she could brag about a few months ago....

(Photo from National Archives)

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Is the solution to feeding a growing global population sitting right there on our plates?

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A grassroots conference last weekend brought African farming leaders to Seattle to take on a green revolution they say is more about profit then poverty alleviation.

Hugo Lucitante pilots a boat on the Ecuadorian Amazon, on the land of the Cofan people, which is threatened by oil extraction. (Photo courtesy Oil and Water)

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Local documentary, “Oil & Water,” tells the story of an Ecuadorean tribe endangered by global warming and oil extraction, an ambassador from that tribe in Seattle and his friendship with a man who helps certify oil companies as environmentally friendly.

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As world leaders debate climate change in New York, Fiji and other Pacific Islands are feeling the impacts first hand.

David La at the UW’s Baker Laboratory is part of a team working on potential Ebola treatments, but they’re also crowdsourcing ideas over the Internet relating to a cure. (Photo by Mark Harrison / The Seattle Times)

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As Ebola spreads at alarming rates in West Africa, local labs are leading the race for an effective treatment.

A market stall in Grand Gedeh County, Liberia, which is so far still relatively Ebola-free and remains under quarantine. (Photo by Karin Huster)

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A Seattleite working on Ebola relief in Liberia reports a dismal lack of resources and staff on the front lines.

A family at a refugee camp in Thailand, where there are still 150,000 UN-recognized refugees unable to return home to Burma. (Photo by Mikhail Esteves)

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Seattleites are donating 'one night out' this weekend to help Burmese refugees who've been forgotten by big international donors.

A Water 1st supporter sporting a shirt that says the name of the organization in Amharic, the official language of Ethiopia. (Photo by Aida Solomon)

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Seattle has a huge global aid sector, and a big immigrant population. So why aren't they working together more?